Old Testament

Genesis

Creation – Discussion Questions

Interpretation Questions:

  1. How do the many similarities with Babylonian creation stories affect our understanding of Genesis 1?
  2. How much of Genesis 1 should we use to determine our current worldview?
  3. Why do we tell creation stories? What larger cultural purpose do they serve?

Application Questions:

  1. Dr. Baden mentioned “the impact of translation” in this week’s video. As you reflect on this problem, how do the word choices in your translation impact the way you envision the creation narrative?
  2. What do you think is the relationship between the science of creation and the story as recorded in Genesis? What problems, if any, does this present for your theological understanding of creation?
  3. The “Image of God” is a common phrase in many communities.  How has your own imagined image of God changed throughout your life? Do you agree with Dr. Collins that humanity represents God on Earth?
  4. Does Genesis 1 inform the way you view gender equality in modern life?

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Take notes on this lesson

2 Notes

  1. roscoe

    As Robert Fitzgerald writes, “If you want to read Homer, learn ancient Greek.” I am now reading Alter and it is the best I have read so far, but I cling to the KJ for its poetry. Any translation is the back side of a tapestry.
    Oh, I don’t go down the rabbit trail of the actual creation. Began something and it evolved. Still is.
    We are an image–that’s it. No more, but no less. A hedge fund if you will.
    Gender in Genesis is not ever something I think is possible to study.

  2. roscoe

    The Bible is a book of 66 chapters written in the Middle East, so all of that area is part of its writing. Can’t separate the parts entirely.
    We can use as much of Genesis as we want to have a world view, but that would present serious problems.
    It is a good book explaining things. But we have warped it, too. For example, how has such a good man as Esau be given such a horrible reputation. He tells his conniving brother, “I have enough.” A good man, the red one.